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Preparing Your Experience

2012 Children's Hospital & Medical Center Snapshot

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Expectation

January 1 – December 31, 2012

Fiscal year 2012 showed growth to the prior year due to increases in outpatient surgeries and clinic visits as well as a strong med/surg census. Children's market share based on total discharges increased during the year while others in the market decreased.

As a result, net operating revenue increased $35.7 million and exceeded $284.5 million while excess revenue over expenses increased $34 million reflecting changes in non-operating investment income. Net assets increased from $279 million in 2011 to $322 million in 2012, reflecting the increase in operating revenues. Total assets increased by $49 million to $480 million in 2012.

Lights. Cameras. Action.

We achieved repeat recognition as one of Omaha’s Best Places to Work and treated more children than ever before. All in all, 2012 was a memorable year in which we celebrated many accomplishments with staff, patients and families.

370,000 Total
Patient Visits

8,200 Inpatient Admissions

7,900 Outpatient
Surgeries


Best Children's Hospitals Rankings

40,700 Emergency and
Urgent Care Visits

Children’s Verified
as Level II Pediatric
Trauma Center

Employee Giving Campaign
Tops $245,000

$1,430,600 Donated
through Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals

Best Places to Work in Omaha
2nd consecutive year

Gala Raises
Record $467,000

1,325 Critical
Care Transports

New Fetal
Care Center Opens

59,400 Outpatient
Specialty Clinic Visits

Best in Class Employee Engagement

Healthy Kohl’s
Kids Introduced

Kohl's Partnership Support Tops
$1.4 million

Direction

At Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, the remarkable achievements of our specialists and subspecialists, nurses, staff and colleagues in 2012 demonstrate the knowledge and experience to chart the proper course for pediatric health care – and that we are taking significant steps in the right direction.

 

 

Collaboration

The More You Know

Children’s Hospital & Medical Center is putting the wise old saying about “an ounce of prevention” into action by sponsoring the HealthTeacher online wellness educational program for every school throughout a nine-county area of eastern Nebraska and western Iowa.

 

Collaboration

The More You Know



Children’s Hospital & Medical Center is putting the wise old saying about “an ounce of prevention” into action by sponsoring the HealthTeacher online wellness educational program for every school throughout a nine-county area of eastern Nebraska and western Iowa.

“HealthTeacher is an easy-to-access and use health education tool that is proving its value nationwide,” says Martin W. Beerman, Vice President of Marketing and Community Relations at Children’s. “In 2012, we became the first organization to introduce it in our area. We presented it to 47 school districts and nearly 160,000 students as a gift to their good health.”

HealthTeacher is a series of online health education lesson plans for teachers and resources for parents. It includes a library of more than 300 Kindergarten-through 12th grade sessions organized around 10 health topics defined by National Health Education Standards: nutrition, personal and consumer health, physical activity, anatomy, alcohol and other drugs, tobacco, community and environmental health, family health and sexuality, mental and emotional health, and injury prevention. HealthTeacher addresses the top six health risk behaviors identified by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Active in nearly three dozen metropolitan markets, HealthTeacher serves more than 10,000 schools and six million students. It is used by nine of the 15 largest school districts in the U.S.

Children’s is offering the HealthTeacher program free of charge to the 413 public and private schools in Douglas, Washington, Dodge, Saunders, Sarpy and Cass counties in Nebraska, and Pottawattamie, Harrison and Mills counties in Iowa.

“Good and bad habits form very early in life,” Beerman says. “If we can plant the seed for good health habits at school and carry them over to the home, we hope to teach children how to live a healthier lifestyle through their adolescence and into adulthood.”

HealthTeacher was originally developed in 1999 by health educators and health professionals with the goal of providing a comprehensive online resource that would make it easy to teach good health habits to children. Today, HealthTeacher is used in all 50 states and 14 foreign countries, from urban and suburban schools to after-school programs and home schools. The lesson plans can stand alone as a school’s only health curriculum, or be used to support and enhance an existing curriculum.

The program seeks to:

  • Increase the health literacy of all teachers,
  • Enable teachers to overcome constraints that limit health education in the classroom,
  • Provide the knowledge, skills and tools that increase the health literacy of all students,
  • Engage parents and other key community stakeholders to reinforce healthy behaviors among children.

In addition to working with many educators directly, HealthTeacher collaborates with its healthcare partners to incorporate feedback and to develop timely, new topics. The program includes lessons that can be taken home and utilized by the entire family to help influence healthier habits.

HealthTeacher is committed to education, outreach and the promotion of health literacy. It is the founding partner of the Blue Apple Awards to recognize exceptional school health programs.

Children’s is supporting HealthTeacher in part because it advances wellness and prevention initiatives designed to improve health by impacting children at the sources of learning – the classroom and in the home.

“School districts are facing many challenges today such as limited health education resources and budget cuts,” Beerman says. “Keeping children healthy keeps them in school. An Alliance for a Healthier Generation survey indicates that nearly 95 percent of responding parents say health education is as important as math, science and English, and we at Children’s agree with them.

“Comprehensive health education prepares children for long, healthy lives. That is why Children’s is taking the lead by making HealthTeacher a resource for teachers, parents and children throughout the metropolitan Omaha area.”

Hope in a Heartbeat

The timing was perfect.

Robert L. Spicer, M.D., clinical service chief of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, was in a “mock” heart transplant presentation in the Glow Auditorium at Children’s when he received a message on his cell phone. Children’s had just received interim approval from the United Network for Organ Sharing to begin a pediatric heart transplantation program.

 

Inspiration

Hope in a Heartbeat



Robert L. Spicer, M.D., clinical service chief of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, was in a “mock” heart transplant presentation in the Glow Auditorium at Children’s when he received a message on his cell phone. Children’s had just received interim approval from the United Network for Organ Sharing to begin a pediatric heart transplantation program.

Dr. Spicer immediately shared the news. The crowded room erupted in applause and cheers.

That was March 18, 2013. Less than a month later, the first pediatric heart transplant in Nebraska in more than 25 years was successfully completed at Children’s.

James Hammel, M.D., FACS, clinical service chief of cardiothoracic surgery at Children’s, led the team that on April 8, 2013 transplanted a donor heart into the chest of two-week-old Lainey Wilkinson, a baby from Council Bluffs born with a combination of congenital heart defects that could not be repaired.

“It is very unusual for a newborn to have such complicated heart disease that a transplant is required before there’s even an attempt at reconstruction,” explains Dr. Hammel. “This was really an extraordinary situation.”

He describes it as a “storybook case” for Children’s. More than historic, the ideal set of circumstances at the right place and at the right time starting with her delivery.

“This infant was referred in and evaluated by our new Fetal Care program. We recognized the chance that she could begin dying immediately after birth because of the severity of her heart defects,” he says. 

Little Lainey was delivered by scheduled cesarean section in the Fetal Care Center at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center in affiliation with Alegent Creighton Health.

“From beginning to end, she’s been able to benefit from services (Fetal Care and transplantation) that we built really just for her and for others like her,” Dr. Hammel shares.

Children’s heart transplantation team has considerable experience in pediatric cardiac surgery and care. Dr. Hammel, a surgical partner in the adult heart transplantation program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), is the primary surgeon. Dr. Spicer, who is the team’s transplant cardiologist, previously served as medical director of cardiac transplantation and director of the cardiology fellowship program at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

The team includes Children’s pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons Kim Duncan, M.D., and Ibrahim Abdullah, M.D., as well as adult cardiothoracic surgeons Michael Moulton, M.D., and John Y. Um, M.D., from UNMC; and Transplant Coordinator Barb Roessner, P.A. Steve Kindle, M.D., joined Dr. Spicer and Carl Gumbiner, M.D., as part of the Children’s cardiology team in July.

The transplantation team also includes cardiac nurses, pediatric cardiac anesthesiologists, dietitians, pharmacists, social workers, psychologists and financial counselors.

Because Children’s already had state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization and surgical facilities, the transplantation program did not require a significant amount of new equipment. Two cold organ procurement units, which produce the sterile icy slush used to pack a donor organ for transplant and to keep it cold once it arrives, were added, as well as new surgical instruments and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) machines with specific capabilities to support patients awaiting transplantation.

Dr. Hammel says the cardiac team anticipates performing five to 10 heart transplants a year for the first few years of the program. “Historically, there are about 40 pediatric heart transplants per year in our region,” he says. “Our goal is to offer the best overall transplant service available and to become the busiest transplant provider in the region.”

Whether repairing a heart defect or performing a transplant, providing high quality, family-centered cardiac care is a priority, Dr. Spicer says.

“Our techniques are not only groundbreaking, they have the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in the long run,” he says. “We have the opportunity to take the most complicated cases and the sickest children and make them healthy.”

The Best Place
for Kids

More than 350,000 patient visits are made to Children's Hospital & Medical Center each year. Every child is unique and deserves to receive care from specialists, nurses, and medical professionals who know children. These compassionate caregivers explain, in their own words, why Children's is the best place for kids.



Watch their story

 

 

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Go back

The Best
Place for Kids

2012 Snapshot

We say it often: children are unique; they are not just small adults. They deserve care that is developed specifically for them – care that is delivered each and every day at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center.

In 2012, we began a meaningful collaboration with Alegent Creighton Health to form the region’s first Fetal Care Center, we successfully completed the verification process to officially become a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center, and we received ongoing recognition by U.S. News & World Report as a Best Children’s Hospital.

The best place for kids. That’s Children’s.

Follow our journey, our snapshot of 2012.